Cat Survives Wildfire By Hiding In Stove

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Each year, wildfires are a dangerin the region of Alberta, Canada.

These firesare nature’s way of clearing out dead trees and foliage, but this year is different. In a matter of days, a wildfire swelled in size from 3,000 acres to 544,000 acres.

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Canadians throughout the province have been forced out of their homes quickly and without warning. Many had to leave very valuable things behind, including their pets.

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Jody Lishchynsky and her family are lucky to be alive. One moment, the blaze was creeping over the hill in theirbackyard, and suddenly the flames were licking up the side of theirhome.

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In the small amount of time they had, the Lishchynskys were able to get into their truck with very few belongings, their dogtrailing behind them. By the time Jody Lishchynsky turned around to get her cats, however, her housewas already in flames.

The devastated family drove away thinking they had lost much more than just their personal belongings in the fire. But Tux, the cat, had other plans.

Scroll through belowfor Tux’s incredible story, and let us know what you think in the comments!

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This year, wildfires have been ripping through Canada at extraordinary speeds.

Families, like theLishchynskys, have been forced to leave with little more than the clothes on their backs.

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Charlee’s Angels for the Animals, an organization that helps to find and rescue animals,has been updating hopeful Canadians on the progress of the many pets left behind.

One such animal that managed to survive the devastation was Tux the cat.

Tux was found among the rubble by one of the incredible firemen working to clear up the mess left behind by the fire.

He was discoveredunder a toppled stove in his burned down home.

According to Charlee’s Angels’s Facebook page, there was an explosion that blew out the stove, allowing room for the cat to crawl in.

Then, another explosion knocked the stove over, trapping and saving Tux from the flames.

Firefighters at the scene bandaged up Tux’s paws and a vet was called to the scene to medicate him immediately.

Soon after, his anxious family were contacted with the good news!

“That is my son, Landon,” JodyLishchynsky explained on Charlee’s Angel’s Facebook page. “Tux is his boy.”

Although the family lost practically everything in the fire, they are thrilled to have their cat Tux back.

Since then, we’ve learned that another one of theLishchynsky’s cats, Sky, survived as well!

Through all the devastation this fire has caused, stories like that of Tux and Sky offera true glimmer of hope.

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Let us know what you think of Tux’s incredible tale of survival in the comments, and don’t forget toSHARE with anyone that’s been following the news of the Canada wildfires!

Read more: http://www.littlethings.com/cat-hides-in-stove-wildfire/

Cooler temperatures, rain give firefighters hope of getting handle on massive Canadian wildfire | Fox News

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Cooler temperatures and light rain have officials optimistic they’ve reached a turning point on getting a handle on a massive wildfire that has devastated parts of Canada’s oil sands town of Fort McMurray.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said the battle against the fire has stabilized to the point where she can visit and begin the next phase of the government’s operation to determine what must be done to eventually allow people to return to the city. A massive evacuation of 25,000 residents displaced by the blaze also came to an end.

More than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray in the heart of Canada’ oil sands, where the fire has torched 1,600 homes and other buildings. Gas has been turned off, the power grid is damaged and water is not drinkable. Officials said there is no timeline to return residents to the city, but the provincial government is sending in a team on Monday to do preliminary planning.

David Yurdiga, the member of Parliament for the area, toured Fort McMurray Sunday and said he was now more optimistic.

“We’ll be back on our feet a lot quicker than I thought we would be,” he told reporters at the roadblock just south of the city. “All of the key infrastructure is in place. Our hospital is standing. Our schools are standing. Our treatment plant is functioning.”

“I toured probably every neighborhood in Fort McMurray and 80 percent of the homes are standing,” he said. “Some areas you don’t even know there was a fire.”

With cooler temperatures forecast for the next three or four days, Alberta fire official Chad Morrison said firefighters should be able to put out hot spots. And it has allowed them to further protect Fort McMurray. He said he was very buoyed and happy that they are making great progress.

“It definitely is a positive point for us, for sure,” said Morrison, who answered yes when asked if the fight to contain the flames had a reached a turning point.

“We’re obviously very happy that we’ve held the fire better than expected,” he said. “This is great firefighting weather. We can really get in here and get a handle on this fire, and really get a death grip on it.”

Notley said the wildfire grew much more slowly than was feared and was now about 620 square miles (1,600 square kilometers) in size. She said the blaze was quite a bit smaller than had been expected on Saturday, when officials expected it to double in size. She added the city was safe for first responders.

It rained on Sunday, and the municipality of Wood Buffalo, which includes Fort McMurray, tweeted a picture of the rainfall and wrote: “It was only for a few minutes but the sight of rain has never been so good.” Notley retweeted the picture and wrote “Here’s hoping for much more!”

Federal Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said they “may be turning a corner” but cautioned it’s too early to celebrate and a lot of work remains.

Officials completed the transport of 25,000 residents out of work camps north of the city after police oversaw a procession of thousands of vehicles Friday and Saturday, and a mass airlift of thousands of evacuees was also employed from the oil mine airfields. The bulk of the city’s evacuees moved south after Tuesday’s mandatory evacuation order, but 25,000 evacuees moved north and were housed in camps normally used for oil sands workers.

No deaths or injuries have been reported from the fire itself. But Notley mentioned two evacuees who died in a traffic accident during the evacuation. Her voiced cracked when talking about the two and noted it is Mother’s Day. Fifteen-year-old Emily Ryan and her stepmother’s nephew, Aaron Hodgson, died in the accident.

The images of Fort McMurray are one of devastation scorched homes and virtually whole neighborhoods burned to the ground.

The fire and mass evacuation has forced a quarter or more of Canada’s oil output offline and was expected to impact an economy already hurt by the fall in oil prices. The Alberta oil sands have the third-largest reserves of oil in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Its workers largely live in Fort McMurray, a former frontier outpost-turned-city whose residents largely come from elsewhere in Canada.

Morrison said the fire has not reached the Suncor or Syncrude oil sands facilities north of Fort McMurray and that the mines north are not under threat. Notley said there will be a meeting with the energy industry on Tuesday to discuss the state of the facilities and the impact on operations.

Suncor said late Sunday it is beginning to implement its plan for a return to operations.

Fort McMurray Fire Chief Darby Allen asked for the patience of residents who are eager to find out if their homes are still standing.

“We are really working hard on that, it’s a complicated process, what’s damaged, what’s left,” Allen said in a posted video. “We really will get that to you as soon as we possibly can.”

Saskatchewan Emergency Management Commissioner Duane McKay said there is heavy smoke in south west Saskatchewan, but no imminent threat of fire to any communities in the province that neighbors Alberta.

Lac La Biche, Alberta, normally a sleepy town of 2,500 about 109 miles south of Fort McMurray, was helping thousands of evacuees, providing a place to sleep, food, donated clothes and even shelter for their pets.

Jihad Moghrabi, a spokesman for Lac La Biche County, said that 4,400 evacuees have come through The Bold Center, a sports facility in town.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/05/09/cooler-temperatures-rain-give-firefighters-hope-getting-handle-on-massive-canadian-wildfire.html

Firefighters’ dramatic attempt to save house from wildfire captured on camera | Fox News

(The Edmonton Journal)

Dramatic video captured on a doorbell security camera shows Canadian firefighters trying to save a house in the Alberta city of Fort McMurray, one of the areas hit hardest by a devastating wildfire.

The nearly seven-minute video, posted by the Edmonton Journal, shows a team of firefighters spraying the house with fire hoses. At one point, the porch ceiling on resident Ken Bells house becomes engulfed in flames, but the team eventually manages to extinguish the blaze.

More than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray in the heart of Canada’ oil sands, where the fire has torched 1,600 homes and other buildings. Gas has been turned off, the power grid is damaged and water is not drinkable. Officials said there is no timeline to return residents to the city, but the provincial government is sending in a team on Monday to do some preliminary planning.

Officials said Sunday they had reached a turning point in fighting an enormous wildfire, hoping to get a “death grip'” on the blaze that ravaged parts of Canada’s oil sands town of Fort McMurray amid cooler temperatures and light rain. Meanwhile, a massive evacuation of residents displaced by the blaze came to an end.

The fire and mass evacuation has forced a quarter or more of Canada’s oil output offline and was expected to impact an economy already hurt by the fall in oil prices. The Alberta oil sands have the third-largest reserves of oil in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Its workers largely live in Fort McMurray.

No deaths or injuries have been reported from the fire itself. Notley, however, mentioned two evacuees who died in a traffic accident during the evacuation. Her voiced cracked when talking about the two and noted it is Mother’s Day. Fifteen-year-old Emily Ryan and her stepmother’s nephew, Aaron Hodgson, died in the accident.

Fort McMurray Fire Chief Darby Allen asked for the patience of residents who are eager to find out if their homes are still standing.

“We are really working hard on that, it’s a complicated process, what’s damaged, what’s left,” Allen said in a posted video. “We really will get that to you as soon as we possibly can. We care about all of you.”

Lac La Biche, Alberta, normally a sleepy town of 2,500 about 110 miles south of Fort McMurray, was helping thousands of evacuees, providing a place to sleep, food, donated clothes and even shelter for their pets.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/05/11/firefighters-dramatic-attempt-to-save-house-from-wildfire-captured-on-camera.html

Canadian officials hope to put ‘death grip’ on massive wildfire | Fox News

Officials said Sunday they had reached a turning point in fighting an enormous wildfire, hoping to get a “death grip'” on the blaze that ravaged parts of Canada’s oil sands town of Fort McMurray amid cooler temperatures and light rain. Meanwhile, a massive evacuation of residents displaced by the blaze came to an end.

Chad Morrison of Alberta Wildfire told a news conference he’s “very happy” and called it great firefighting weather.

“We can really get in there and really get a handle on this fire and really get a death grip on it,” said Morrison, who answered yes when asked if they’ve reached a turning point.

With cooler temperatures expected in the next three or four days, he said firefighters should be able to put out hot spots. And it has allowed them to further protect fire-ravaged Fort McMurray. “I feel very buoyed and happy that we are making great progress,” he said.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley said the wildfire grew much more slowly than had been feared and it was now 397,831 acres. She said the blaze is quite a bit smaller than had been expected on Saturday, when officials expected the fire to double in size.

She added the city is safe for first responders and that she will visit the city on Monday to assess the damage.

David Yurdiga, the member of Parliament for the area, toured Fort McMurray on Sunday and said he was it was optimistic.

“We’ll be back on our feet a lot quicker than I thought we would be,” he told reporters at a roadblock just south of the city. “All of the key infrastructure is in place. Our hospital is standing. Our schools are standing. Our treatment plant is functioning.”

“I toured probably every neighborhood in Fort McMurray and 80 percent of the homes are standing,” he said. “Some areas you don’t even know there was a fire.”

It rained on Sunday. The Rural Municipality of Wood Buffalo, which includes Fort McMurray, tweeted a picture of the rainfall and wrote: “It was only for a few minutes but the sight of rain has never been so good.” Notley retweeted the picture and wrote “Here’s hoping for much more!”

Federal Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale said they “may be turning a corner” but it’s too early to celebrate and a lot of work remains.

Officials completed the transport of 25,000 residents out of work camps north of the city. Police and military oversaw a procession of thousands of vehicles Friday and Saturday, and a mass airlift of thousands of evacuees was also employed from the oil sands camps that usually house workers.

No deaths or injuries have been reported from the fire itself. Notley, however, mentioned two evacuees who died in a traffic accident during the evacuation. Her voiced cracked when talking about the two and noted it is Mother’s Day. Fifteen-year-old Emily Ryan and her stepmother’s nephew, Aaron Hodgson, died in the accident.

The images of Fort McMurray are one of devastation scorched homes and virtually whole neighborhoods burned to the ground.

More than 80,000 people have left Fort McMurray in the heart of Canada’ oil sands, where the fire has torched 1,600 homes and other buildings. Gas has been turned off, the power grid is damaged and water is not drinkable. Officials said there is no timeline to return residents to the city, but the provincial government is sending in a team on Monday to do some preliminary planning.

The fire and mass evacuation has forced a quarter or more of Canada’s oil output offline and was expected to impact an economy already hurt by the fall in oil prices. The Alberta oil sands have the third-largest reserves of oil in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela. Its workers largely live in Fort McMurray.

Morrison said the fire has not reached the Suncor or Syncrude oil sands facilities north of Fort McMurray and that the mines north are not under threat. Notley said there will be a meeting with the energy industry on Tuesday and said topics will include the state of facilities and the impact on operations.

About 25,000 evacuees moved north in the hours after Tuesday’s mandatory evacuation, and were housed in camps normally used to house oil sands employees. Officials then moved everyone south Friday and Saturday.

Just over 18 miles south of Fort McMurray, the main highway into town is blocked off by barricades and police vehicles.

Fort McMurray Fire Chief Darby Allen asked for the patience of residents who are eager to find out if their homes are still standing.

“We are really working hard on that, it’s a complicated process, what’s damaged, what’s left,” Allen said in a posted video. “We really will get that to you as soon as we possibly can. We care about all of you.”

Lac La Biche, Alberta, normally a sleepy town of 2,500 about 110 miles south of Fort McMurray, was helping thousands of evacuees, providing a place to sleep, food, donated clothes and even shelter for their pets.

Jihad Moghrabi, a spokesman for Lac La Biche County, said 4,400 evacuees have come through The Bold Center, a sports facility in town.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2016/05/08/canadian-officials-hope-to-put-death-grip-on-massive-wildfire.html

Meet The Pilot Saving Puppies and Kittens From Canadas Wildfires

As wildfires rage in Alberta, one intrepid pilot is ferrying furry friends to safety.”>

As the Fort McMurray wildfire raged and people fled, Keith Mann vowed to leave no man, dog or chinchilla behind.

So the Suncor Energy pilot broke the rules and welcomed more than 40 critters aboard flights heading south to Edmonton and Calgary.

Mann estimates his Suncor plane, along with other chartered companies, helped evacuate 10,000 people from Fort McMurray, where the out-of-control inferno rained fire and embers down from the sky and destroyed 2,500 buildings.

But Mann also helped dozens of furry friends to safety, too.

I can tell you where I work, were all animal lovers, Mann told The Daily Beast. We all love dogs. I could totally understand why you cant separate with your pet. I would have a hard time myself.

After the inferno swept the Alberta city on May 3, residents were banned from re-entering and some were forced to leave without their pets. Mann was one aviator who helped reunite them, according to the Toronto Star, which first revealed the mile-high menagerie.

Last week, Mann learned of 300 citizens being housed in a lodge near the fire-ravaged city. His company arranged for the evacuees to be bused about 70 miles northwest to Suncor Energys airport, where theyd then be flown to shelters.

The refugees came with dozens of fuzzy, prickly and four-legged companions. Mann told The Daily Beast he figured people would bring a handful of pets. The pilot had no clue hed soon navigate a zoo in the sky.

To keep all travelers happy, two dogs had to be kept in the bathroom so they wouldnt turn smaller pets into chew toys.

Two canines from the same family curled up together and didnt move, instead opting to snuggle the entire flight.

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Some tail-waggers even got the first-class treatment. Staff tried to make a mammoth Great Dane lie down on the floor, but he crawled onto a seat and wouldnt budge.

He displaced a passenger, actually, Mann said.

All animal aviators were calm until landing, when they greeted crews with happy barks on the ground, Mann said.

The pets were either traveling with their humans, or would be reunited with them once they reached Edmonton and Calgary shelters.

The majority of them had their owners with them. There were a few people that took dogs on behalf of their owners, Mann said. When we got to our destinations, none were unclaimed.

Meanwhile, the Fort McMurray SPCA joined other volunteer groups to rescue more 244 pets in 96 hours. The animals were sent to Edmonton on May 8, Fort McMurray Today reported.

Other residents went rogue to rescue stranded animals, ignoring evacuation orders and smashing windows to check buildings for pets.

Wyatt Colquhoun-Rivard and fellow members of the Western Canadian Powerstrokes, a Ford truck enthusiast group, rescued one womans five dogs and three cats, CBC News reported.

It was a spur of the moment thing, Colquhoun-Rivard told CBC. And we just decided not to sit around anymore. We said, Lets go save some petsWe went rogue.

Read more: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/05/11/meet-the-pilot-saving-puppies-and-kittens-from-canada-s-wildfires.html